Flags are an easily identifiable visual representation of a community, nation, or cause. They have the ability to unite people, spark conversations, and create a sense of belonging. Whether you want to show your love for your country, support a cause, or celebrate a historical event, flying a flag is a great way to proudly display your values.

What Makes a High Quality Flag?

A good flag is more than a piece of fabric, it evokes a sense of identity, and unity. Our flags are made from high-quality materials, ensuring they can withstand the Australian climate and retain their vibrant colours over time.

We stock the standard size flag of 1800mm x 900mm and a selection of smaller and larger sized flags.

National flags | State flags | Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander flags | AFL flags | Flags of all Nations | Custom-made flags

We believe in providing great quality flags and helping you display them correctly. 

aust, aboriginal and south australia flag flying together
aust and south australia flag

Flag Etiquette

A flag should always be:

  • treated with respect
  • raised no earlier than first light and lowered no later than dusk
  • raised quickly
  • flown as close to the top of the flagpole as possible and with the rope tightly secured
  • if being flown at night it should be illuminated

A flag should not be:

  • allowed to lie upon or touch the ground
  • used to unveil monuments or plaques,
  • used to cover tables or seats
  • used as a curtain
  • flown when damaged or faded
  • flown upside down (even as a distress signal)
  • flown from the same flagpole as another flag
australian flag flying

Flag Precedence

The Australian Flag takes precedence over all flags when flown in Australia – except for the United Nations Flag on United Nations Day.

If you have more than one flagpole, and they are in a straight row, then the Australian Flag should always be far left (if you are facing the building). If there are two Australian Flags, they are placed at each end of a line of flagpoles.

When the Australian Flag is flown with flags from other countries, all flags should be the same size and flown on flagpoles of the same height.

The correct order for flying flags is:

  1. Australian Flag
  2. National flags of other nations
  3. State and territory flags
  4. Aboriginal Flag and Torres Strait Islander Flag,
  5. Other flags
  6. Ensigns and pennants (including local government, private organisations, sporting clubs and community groups).

The Australian Flag should be raised first and lowered last.

The union jack on the Australian and State flags is always positioned closest to the flagpole, so if flying horizontally, the union jack is in the top left. If flying vertically the union jack is still in the top left corner.

half mast british flag

Half Mast

Flags are flown at half-mast as a sign of mourning.

Flags can be flown at half- mast on the death of a local citizen, or the day of their funeral.

When flying flags at half-mast:

  • all flags should be flown at half- mast together
  • the Australian Flag should be raised first and lowered last
  • the flag should be raised to the top of the flagpole briefly, and then lowered slowly
  • flags flown at half-mast should be positioned a third of the distance down the flagpole
  • no flags are to be flown at half-mast after dark, even if illuminated

FLAGS AT FUNERALS

The flag can be used to cover the coffin of any Australian at their funeral.

The upper left quarter of the flag should be draped over the ‘left shoulder’ of the coffin to represent the heart and the flag should be removed before the coffin is lowered into the ground, or after the service at a crematorium.

aust and south australia flag

Flag Etiquette

A flag should always be:

  • treated with respect
  • raised no earlier than first light and lowered no later than dusk
  • raised quickly
  • flown as close to the top of the flagpole as possible and with the rope tightly secured
  • if being flown at night it should be illuminated

A flag should not be:

  • allowed to lie upon or touch the ground
  • used to unveil monuments or plaques,
  • used to cover tables or seats
  • used as a curtain
  • flown when damaged or faded
  • flown upside down (even as a distress signal)
  • flown from the same flagpole as another flag
australian flag flying

Flag Precedence

The Australian Flag takes precedence over all flags when flown in Australia – except for the United Nations Flag on United Nations Day.

If you have more than one flagpole, and they are in a straight row, then the Australian Flag should always be far left (if you are facing the building). If there are two Australian Flags, they are placed at each end of a line of flagpoles.

When the Australian Flag is flown with flags from other countries, all flags should be the same size and flown on flagpoles of the same height.

The correct order for flying flags is:

  1. Australian Flag
  2. National flags of other nations
  3. State and territory flags
  4. Aboriginal Flag and Torres Strait Islander Flag,
  5. Other flags
  6. Ensigns and pennants (including local government, private organisations, sporting clubs and community groups).

The Australian Flag should be raised first and lowered last.

The union jack on the Australian and State flags is always positioned closest to the flagpole, so if flying horizontally, the union jack is in the top left. If flying vertically the union jack is still in the top left corner.

half mast british flag

Half Mast

Flags are flown at half-mast as a sign of mourning.

Flags can be flown at half- mast on the death of a local citizen, or the day of their funeral.

When flying flags at half-mast:

  • all flags should be flown at half- mast together
  • the Australian Flag should be raised first and lowered last
  • the flag should be raised to the top of the flagpole briefly, and then lowered slowly
  • flags flown at half-mast should be positioned a third of the distance down the flagpole
  • no flags are to be flown at half-mast after dark, even if illuminated

FLAGS AT FUNERALS

The flag can be used to cover the coffin of any Australian at their funeral.

The upper left quarter of the flag should be draped over the ‘left shoulder’ of the coffin to represent the heart and the flag should be removed before the coffin is lowered into the ground, or after the service at a crematorium.